The Difference Between Noncompliance and Defiance

Here’s a blog post that I picked up via poitigeir.com.

Well worth a read.

http://catalyst.nejm.org/the-difference-between-noncompliance-and-defiance/?utm_campaign=Connect%20Weekly&utm_source=hs_email&utm_medium=email&utm_content=52324768&_hsenc=p2ANqtz-8Ue6agsjFNb9qWeHqx-iyIbgRBM_pY3OgPdOBj_luNZYkEXNCnnJaxdiEqfVW4ZkNelAfteFx_7BBkB8vsZPb1FLJ25Q&_hsmi=52324768

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Dutch Doctors Against Quackery

Here’s a site that I found via Stephen Barrett MD of Quackwatch.org.  To quote from his newsletter

History of Dutch antiquackery group posted

Atlas Obscura, a site that focuses on “the world’s wondrous and curious places, has posted a history of Vereniging tegen de Kwakzalverij, the Dutch Society against Quackery, which now has over 1,700 members. [Grundhauser E. What’s kept the Society against Quackery going for 137 years. Atlas Obscura, May 19, 2017] The society formed in the late 1800s in an effort to raise awareness of the growing number of quacks operating in the Netherlands. Initially, the group was focused on rooting out fraudulent doctors and suspicious medicines (nostrums). Its members, mostly doctors and other educated men, would chemically test suspect remedies, and if they were found to be placebos or otherwise ineffective, the Society would publish their findings in its journal. In recent years, the society’s focus has been on “alternative” methods, not only in Holland but throughout the world. In the early 1990s, the society fiercely lobbied against homeopathic products, and in 2000 it released a list of the 20 greatest quacks of the 20th century. The society has been sued many times for libel, but has won all but one case and ended up with more members and support as a result of the exposure.

The site in in Dutch but google translate using Chrome gives a good readable version.